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The Starving Artist

This topic is about rates and wages that an artist should start to consider when taking on a new job. This is my advice, so take this as advice.

So let’s begin. As an artist you  should know right away that you are valuable. You can recreate people’s imagination and ideas into reality. You are the one who brings people together to be able to all see the vision for the final product. This is valuable. Keep this in mind when you take new jobs. Think about how many hours you plan on slaving over iteration after iteration. Because even though you may have a voice, if you agree to whatever the arrangement are, you must live up to their standards. So make sure you are paid well.

Imagine a client asks you to do 50 hours of work for only $500 dollars. That’s $10 an hour. That is not enough. You can go get a job that could pay you as much if not more, without being an artist. I’ve seen people’s salaries as low as 30k a year. This is not acceptable especially if they graduated from a college that costs them 90k in loans.

I suggest the following to all my fellow artists, that the minimum for your time should at least be $30 an hour. I have seen people make as much as $200-500 an hour to give you some perspective. Now that may seem like a lot but some of these artists deserve it, but some don’t. Either way the flux in income needs to be equalized so we all benefit from this, especially artists who are just starting out. It’s not fair that people get paid dimes and nickels for stuff that actually has tons of value.

If you have quality work, I’d highly recommend charging in the $75-$150 an hour, Novices $40-$60 an hour, and beginners no lower than $30 an hour. I hope this guide helps you and informs you of your worth. Your time and skills are valuable, don’t lose sight of that.

Good Luck,
AJ

And to give you guys some more perspective. I never go below $100 an hour for freelance gigs.

Also some images for a comic I'm putting together of many. Sneak peek
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:iconkirkparrish:
KIRKparrish Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks for this Anthony. It's very refreshing to hear your blunt honestly with this gray area. You're one of the few artists that's willing to cover this type of information to such detail.
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:iconjras22:
JRAS22 Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2014  Professional Filmographer
thanks! now I have to redo my prices
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:iconcheneytoons:
Cheneytoons Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2014  Professional General Artist
Excellent thinking here.  On behalf of all pros, thank you for posting such a well written piece.
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:iconflyqueen:
FlyQueen Featured By Owner Jun 25, 2014   Digital Artist
Finally somebody who just tells straight forward what's the deal! Thank you for this journal! 
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:icondracos123:
Dracos123 Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2014
*glances across at random*

You're very right on some things.  Artists should value themselves, charge a reasonable living wage depending on how many hours they expect to spend on a project, what they'll need for food, rent, luxuries, taxes (hopefully paying those), etc.  Knowing a good eyeball cost level is important to know when a project is worth taking, and knowing how much you can generally be effectively charging while filling work.

A lot of people can be terrible and cheap, though also being open to negotiating the project size to fit the budget is an excellent skill too, and can serve an artist better than a hardline, at least for projects of at least a minimal budget range.

On the other hand, it's something of a blinder to not recognize how things are trending.  There's a significant glut of available artistic workers.  The easy international interaction, and increased purchasing weight of certain currencies, doesn't help at all, and in many places is strangling even high end professional talent against the readily available crowds willing and able to compete on quality at a fraction of the price.  It's an overpopulated career area, and in some degree fair valuing suffers from it.  I've totally seen companies that hire 5-10 artists at the 40-100k range here, and and 40 artists in another country for a few hundred dollars a week, less than what any one of the ones here is making.  This is entire companies of people playing the we can under-bid you game while still making a reasonable living in their country.
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:iconsuper34sonic:
super34sonic Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2014  Student Artisan Crafter
This will help me in the future thank you for this advice
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:iconmishai:
Mishai Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
uhm....just uhm in my country normaly people work for 2-5 dollars per hour....the great payed ones for 15dollars:/ some really good layers may have here around 100 dollars per hour :( damn i feel poor now
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:iconmia2014:
Mia2014 Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I wanna become an artist's when I grow up but my dad says I'll be  starving artist and that I should just do art for  a hobby.
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:icontalxorfire:
TalXorFire Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2014  Student Digital Artist
This is fantastic advice! I've been curious about this for awhile, but could never find someone to just tell it straight. 
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:iconsilverace88:
SilverAce88 Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2014  Student General Artist
This is excellent advice. I've never been sure how much the average price to charge should be, but this makes it far clearer. Best of all is that you put your own personal experience in at the end to prove that it works.
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:iconpeasantrebellion:
Peasantrebellion Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014
Just my two cents.

This happens to writers also, probably even more so. The fact that everyone gets taken advantage of initially separates the working pros and the future hobbyists. Eventually you either make it or it breaks you badly. 

Good luck to all of you, some seriously talented artists on this site. 
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:icondeathbydays:
deathbydays Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014
In my opinion, I've come to see that people will undercharge and devalue themselves in a type of competition with other artists. They see someone who might be better than them charging cheap (either because they don't know what to charge, or they're competing because they saw someone else do the same thing too) and just want a better chance at getting commissions.

It also doesn't help that people are always demanding lower prices. They, of course as the buyer, would want a better deal or to get the most bang for their buck. They might not have much to give, and if there are plenty of people who are like this gaining on one artist, it can nearly force them into lowering their prices just to get a buyer.

Or, there's the chance that they don't network themselves well and hardly have any exposure. They could get let-down at seeing no one buying commissions from them and lower their prices, hoping to gain an audience.

Then there's also people who just don't know what they should charge, and probably go off of everyone else's prices, further adding to the problem.

It's a cycle that both burdens artists, and is caused by them, and it's sad. It's sad, because many people won't make enough to live off of, and it can destroy their dreams or cause them to be poor.
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:iconannaklava:
AnnaKlava Featured By Owner Edited Jun 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This. This right here. On DA, the clientel are poor college stdents, highschool students who are usually minors or simply people who aren't the clientel you're looking for.

This is why I underchage my work. No one will buy on this site if you charge what the OP is suggesting, hell I tried selling art for almost a decent wage years ago and I got no bites. I'm striving to be a graphic designer and once I get such a job, I hopefully won't need to commission dirt-ass cheap prices to compete with the market.

I used to agree that yes, underselling yourself is bad but what can you do when you can't really advertise? I know DA is the worst place to sell art, but advertising is a whole other feat of it's own that I don't know how to do.
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:icondeathbydays:
deathbydays Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014
And most of the artists aren't "professional-level" artists who get jobs at many different places, so they have to turn to those who are in school.

I think charging what Robotpencil charges can work if you have a large following, and have decent connections, or have another job.

An easy way to advertise yourself is to put everything in groups, go on many different websites that are like deviantART, and to pay for actual advertising on those websites if you can scrap together the money. I wish I had more ways to offer, but that's all I can say. It's pretty tough :c
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:iconannaklava:
AnnaKlava Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Very true there and well said!

I personally only have 1/4 the watchers of that he has. Like 900 something. I'd have to get up to par with the realism/semi/realism like his before I charge that much. He's rather popular, so it works for him to charge that much. It truly is dependent on your audience.

I  appreciate the advice!
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:icondeathbydays:
deathbydays Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014
Thank you then!

Well, putting a lot of your art into groups, maybe putting up polls to find out what your watchers like and doing some of that every once in a while, and maybe fanart would help greatly?

You're welcome, I hope I helped! ;u;
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:iconannaklava:
AnnaKlava Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
That ain't a bad idea! Thank you! It did. :3
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:iconpijus:
pijus Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Goooood stuff. I love you for this!
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:iconblue-midnight-angel:
Blue-Midnight-Angel Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for posting this. It's very helpful. :D
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:iconhetseeker:
hetseeker Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014
I've found this very useful, thanks :)
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:icondevioussqurl:
DeviousSqurl Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
It's nice advice, I have no idea what to ask someone to pay for my artwork.  I am a beginner and haven't really tested freelance waters.  I had some mutual acquaintances that just asked for some artwork.  And for a 8 days work painting like 6 hours a day I only ask for 40 dollars total lol.  But figured it was someone I knew and I thought that was much to ask lolol.  
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:iconrebirthlikeaphoenix:
RebirthLikeAPhoenix Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Personaly, when i direct my game projects i always discuss the price with the co-worker(s) and make sure we both accepts the price
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:icondeadmaul:
DeadMaul Featured By Owner Edited Jun 18, 2014   General Artist
I think most clients will run for the hills when they see an artist charging that much. Of course big name companies will pay that much for artwork but it must be high quality and produce within their tight deadlines.

So in the end, the thing you could do is either (providing if the client can afford at least $10 per hour of work)

-produce the low quality artwork on purpose that fit the client's low budgets

-offer a strip down service (for example, your client wants a colored comic page for $30 per page and you counter offer a sketchy flat colour comic or reduce the amount of panels you need to do or simplify your current style so you can produce it faster, of course you don't include the thumbnail planning for the comic because it takes up time)

-you could just say you can do this for (insert rather low but okay rates) but you retain the copyrights and resell it as merchandise if you wish or you could ask for royalties from each commercial product made from your artwork is sold.

-hold back from doing any artwork for clients and concentrate in building an audience to make a name for yourself.

-just sell prints/postcards/merchandise that you made

I think most artist wouldn't do the first two because they wouldn't want a lousy piece for their portfolio.
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:iconcrypticmanifestation:
CrypticManifestation Featured By Owner Edited Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This post is a good start, but you are missing a lot of factors. Local economy is a big one. Where I come from 10$ an hour is good pay and a lot of people don't make that on top of that you can get your art degree for less than 20k total on US accredited schools.

Another thing is to understand about marketing, branding and perceived value. Not to mention the economics of supply and demand. Right now the supply of artists in certain areas far outweighs the demands. In other places the demand for artist is not very high. In both of those environments charging the kinds of rates you suggest will bankrupt the artist. So what each artist needs to do is study his environment, develop his brand and charge according to his unique supply and demands environment.

That said were an artist large and significant enough artist group to create a Cooperative type business to provide services for all sorts of costumers world wide. Then that cooperative effort could result in price stabilization for art and give artists what they should earn according to their experience. But that would require a bunch of artist getting together and agreeing to help each other out.
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:icondevioussqurl:
DeviousSqurl Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
This makes a lot of sense.  My city doesn't even have a lot of jobs out there for artist normally, so it's really not in demand here but I am close to NY and there are a lot more artistic employment opportunities there so it would be in more demand, but as a beginner with no degree I couldn't ask for 30 an hour for freelance, unless I had a client base already and a general interest for my work.  I figured if you are going to make it a business for yourself you have to start small and get the attention first. :)
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:iconcrypticmanifestation:
CrypticManifestation Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
On top of that charging hourly for work on art doesn't make a lot of sense. I mean if two artist can create the same image, same style, same everything, do you think the one that takes twice as long should be paid twice as much? How many hours you put into a piece should influence the what you charge your costumer but you have to factor in a bunch of other things
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:iconshotgunandcookies:
shotgunandcookies Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Student General Artist
This was very helpful, thank you very much.

I've started working as an online cartoonist/illustrator for a few months now and my rate is $4/hr. The biggest single pay I got for one commission was $17 and that was haggled from a mere $20. I did 10 hours on that illustration and only had a mouse to color it digitally. But I didn't know any better so I just took the price. I was afraid if I raised my quote the client will simply just find another artist to do his job.

At least now I know the ceiling price is.
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:iconnataliasoleil:
NataliaSoleil Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you for shating...
It is sad how so many simply refuse to page an average hourly rate...
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:iconmariofernandes:
mariofernandes Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014
Thank you for your insight, it's worth gold
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:iconmew-suika:
Mew-Suika Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I worked for 5$ an hour, with a base rate of 20$, the logo I created then equated to 35$, apparently that was too much. He then went on to say how much money he just spent on his graphics card (86k by the way) and he couldn't pay 35$... I've negotiated it back down to the base price, which he still hasn't paid.

Thank you for this, I was so lost for what to charge, thank you, won't affect this customer but now I know for the future!
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:iconfalynevarger:
FalyneVarger Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional General Artist
Not to be rude, but your situation tells me that your client did not value the work you were doing from the start. They're not a good client and most likely never intended to pay you.
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:iconmew-suika:
Mew-Suika Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Not rude at all :) and yea it was a bit of a learning curve... I'll try to pick my clients a little better next time D:
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:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Finally! Somebody that says what should be said! :la:
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:iconsophiesuffocate:
SophieSuffocate Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
//claps//
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:icongriffinfly:
Griffinfly Featured By Owner Edited Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
I think it would be more realistic to base those rates on local expenses.

Basic food basket in US is 1,5 - 2 times more expensive than here in Russia for example,
I imagine the situation is same for rent, transport etc. Not mentioning the crazy medical expenses and student loans ppl from US have to pay.

A monthly salary for an in-house gamedev artist, in Moscow, converts to basically 15 $/h and it is considered a VERY good pay.
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:icongabrielegabba:
gabrielegabba Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Fantastic journal.  The more we talk about this the less it happens!!
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:iconpreposterous-panda:
preposterous-panda Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Student General Artist
I have been getting paid 30 USD for my commissions and they take like 10 hours. H-have I been underselling my stuff?
I always feel like it should be based on talent and just don't feel right asking for more.
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:iconhealer-and-protecter:
Healer-and-protecter Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Rate your works on quality, not hourly rate. If your artworks are something like the pieces in the online game called "The Cryptids". Jack up the cost on your work to $200, per piece. Do NOT go any lower, that is a BASE price.
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:iconpreposterous-panda:
preposterous-panda Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Student General Artist
Hourly wages are pretty hard to get right with artwork, so much getting up and multitasking it's hard to measure the exact time you spend on a piece.
My art isn't nearly as good as from that game, that stuff is gold.
I have gotten four commissions at 30USD for ones similar to
:thumb456926553:
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:iconsportfrog:
SportFrog Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
You need to think about other people's money struggles too, though. It's not that all these people undervalue artists (I'm sure some do, but not all), but I think the main thing is financial problems. Some of these people might just mean that the price point is just above what they can afford. So you really need to think about where you live. If you live in like Beverly Hills, then you can charge a lot more, but if you're not in an area that's REALLY wealthy, then you have to figure out if you'll do better by charging more money and having less clients or charging less and having more clients. Plus you have to think about what you're making. Some things require more labor than others. For example, making a painting is not as physically demanding as making some huge sculpture, so the sculpture should cost more money per hour, than the painting. You also have to think about how well known you are. The more known you are, the more you can charge. There's many art festivals around my area. These artists aren't very well known, to my knowledge, and some of the prizes I come across, are ridiculous. I'm no professional artist, i'm just a casual hobbyist, so my knowledge of all this stuff is limited, but there's been pieces of art, that cost like $500-$2000, that I know I could do myself. This one guy that I see every year, I can not stand him. He completely over charges, and you can see the arrogance radiating off his body, and his artwork isn't anything special. They'll be a bunch of other artists, with similar artwork to his, who charge half the price, and seem like humble people. So please, no one get mad and offended. I'm just trying to help out a bit and say that setting a price shouldn't be just based on your experience level, or your work quality. I mean, I totally agree, artists should be paid more, but charging more isn't always the best answer, because depending on things, that could end up making things worse.  Also, just note that, if someone says your price point is too high, or never gets back to you, after you give them a quote, it might not be that they undervalue artists. Maybe they we're just hoping that they could afford whatever artwork they wanted, and then they couldn't, because I bet that's the main issue. My parents, and many other people I know, that go to these festivals, know that a lot of the artwork is worth the money, but they simply cannot afford it. My parents always stop to look at these art-silk "paintings" that they want very badly, but they are insanely expensive. They have never said "wow, what a ripoff" or something like that. We completely understand why those are so expensive, I mean seriously, they look so complicated, and they're absolutely gorgeous. The reason why we don''t buy one is because we simply do not have the money. The lady was actually selling some very small ones (I mean like index card small and only a bit of it actually has the silk-art), for like $50. I almost bought it. I thought it was totally worth the money, but all I pretty much had was $50 and I really had to save it for college stuff. 
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:iconyip-lee:
Yip-Lee Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
You have some interesting points, but i just want to voice my opinion on a few things.

You're right that not every client undervalues artists and that they genuinely want to just find the best artist that they can afford (perhaps they can't afford much) and also some clients really just don't have any idea how much hiring someone should cost.

I believe that "setting a price shouldn't be just based on your experience level, or your work quality" is completely wrong. Your rates should reflect your skill level. If the client can't afford you, simply let them go and move on. You can spend time on your own things and improve and get even better clients/opportunities down the road for sure. You will definitely reach your goal much faster that way. You should be paid what you're worth.

Anthony is talking about freelance rates, so thinking about where you live and what areas are "REALLY wealthy" is not really an argument here, as standard rates for freelancers would apply internationally.

I am not a well known artist, or a very good one either but "$500-$2000" is not ridiculous at all, even i have charged within that bracket. If the artwork really isn't anything special and its something you can do, as you said yourself; whats stopping you from doing it?
You need to remember that the clients are paying for the finished product. Say you painted a simple book cover for $1000, and it only took you 5 hours. Thats being paid $200 per hour right? Suddenly that $100 doesn't seem that unrealistic anymore :)

Ultimately i believe what the journal post is trying to say is that, the artistic community as a whole, needs to stop undervaluing themselves and working for less, that just hurts everyone and the art community as a whole. We are people with a skill set that is worth a lot more than the kid flipping burgers at the local fast food restaurant or the telemarketer who buggs you on the phone every once in a while etc. But the reality is, that there are artists that would settle for rates lower than those who work in said occupations.

If we all stop settling for the lower rates, then everybody benefits. There are definitely clients/companies that take advantage of fresh artists and charge lower rates, because they can. Why can they? Because artists are willing to work for those rates.

Just my two cents though :)
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:iconsportfrog:
SportFrog Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
First off, "setting a price shouldn't be just based on your experience level, or your work quality" isn't completely wrong. I said "just" meaning that they should be a part of it, but you need to consider more than that, and my argument about where you live, actually is argument, as agreed on by another guy. Yeah, standard rates SHOULD apply internationally, but that's not realistic because every area in the world, isn't in the same financial position. Third, I didn't say that $500-$2000 is ridiculous for EVERY piece of artwork. I said for things that are really nothing special. Please tell me why I would spend $2000 on something that I could easily do myself or by something similar, from another artist, for half the price? And the discussion is not about, why don't I do it myself? I saying that people aren't going to get many customers, if they charge a lot for something that those customers could really do themselves, so don't over charge on simple things. And $1000 for a simple book cover, is pretty ridiculous. I mean, if you're working for some publishing company, then you can get away with that. I mean seriously, think about it. Most doctors probably work for about $100/hour, and they're saving lives and they have a lot more school loans to pay off than an artist does. I know a lot of people will probably be ticked at me for saying that, but that's the truth. I mean, if you're clients are some coporation, then by all means, charge a lot of money, you should because not only should they pay for the artwork itself, but they should pay for using the artwork for their business, whether it's a book cover, or a logo, or a piece of artwork to show off in their lobby to make the business look more impressive, or whatever it is. But, if you're making artwork for individual clients, then charging $100/hour is unreasonable, unless, like I said, you live in an area where these clients are wealthy or if you're doing something that takes A LOT of skill, like that silk-art.

But that's just my personal opinion. I'm just one of those people who try to get people to consider other things about whatever topic. I think most people think mostly in black and white. I'm personally a grey girl, and think that things always depends on other factors, and these are the factors that I think need to be thought about more. I personally think that people would be more successful that way. So if anyone thinks that I don't respect artist enough for something, believe me, I respect them very much. I think it's just important to think about what I said. Anyways, good luck to all of you artists. I hope that you do make the money you deserve. Just think about how to get to that point. 
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:iconanthonydevine:
AnthonyDevine Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
This is just some of my advice through my own experiences, so please take it only as that- advice ;)  


Most professionals don't take on 'individual' clients for some of the reasons you've stated above, like 'the need to think about other people's money struggles'.  Most professionals will just stick to working with corporate clients whom can afford what the artist is looking for or both can come to an amicable arrangement on rates, whether it be hourly paid or by painting.  If an artist can't yet work for companies, the artist shouldn't waste their time doing free work or working for peanuts, instead, the artist should concentrate on developing their own skills, portfolio and eventually, with time, doors will begin to open.  Artists really need to zone into 'business mode' when thinking about their rates and what's being asked of them.  After that, turn on 'artist mode' by all means to then go and do the job.  That's called business.  Professionalism!  The only money struggling an artist should be worrying about is their own.  If you can understand your market, where you're targeting your portfolio, then you'll be better placed in researching your market rates.  

If an artist's financial problems are their own, then it stands to reason that a 'potential clients' financial struggles are their own!  Just advice.  That's all. :)
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:iconsportfrog:
SportFrog Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Ah, yes. For corporations, an artist should definitely charge a lot. As you said, corporations can afford that, plus the corporation shouldn't just pay for the artwork itself, but also using it for their business. And I didn't mean they should be worrying about other people's money struggles (though everyone should be concerned about others). I meant what you said, "If you can understand your market, where you're targeting your portfolio, then you'll be better placed in researching your market rates." So, if someone is doing individual clients, they need to look at whether they live in a wealthier area or average, because in a wealthier area, more people will be paying more, and many artists in that same area, will probably be charging more, but if you're in an average area, where people can't pay as much, and many artists in that same area, won't be charging as much, you won't do very well if you charge more than the other artists are charging and more than the clients are able to pay. Worrying about client's financial problems would be more of an individual thing like, "oh this person seems kind of poor, so I won't charge them as much as the other person who I just worked for, who seemed to have a bit of money."
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:iconkelathi:
Kelathi Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I think this post is very well said and raises some good points, but I just want to raise some points too :P

I think it's a bit unfair to compare paintings and sculptures and say one should be cheaper because it's not as taxing, it's not a realistic statement and is over-generalised. Some people spend years on paintings, and not even just on little ones, on huge frescos that cover walls. But even if the same amount of effort has not been involved in the making of the artwork, the value of a piece of art should not always be due to the amount of effort. Art is also about the impact that it has on the viewer. A plain blue canvas wont have the same affect on two different people.
Also saying that some artwork isn't good enough to be pricey is misleading. It's not about whether you can do it yourself, art is never about that, if it was, paintings by Jackson Pollock would be under $30. All art is subjective, so artwork that you may not see value in because it is not complex, may still sell for thousands because somebody else thinks it's wonderful. It's about what people are willing to pay. :)

But I also agree that with what you said about being aware of other people's incomes in the place that you work. It is a very good point, as people will not pay if they simply can afford to. Then i guess it's down to the artist to decide how low they are willing to go and still be able to survive.

Great comment!
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:iconsportfrog:
SportFrog Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, that's a good point, art is subjective. I'll admit, I'm not a Pollack fan. It personally makes me angry, because to me, it's an example of how a big part of success, is luck. I just don't see what's so great about those paintings. I see them and think about all the other artists of the world, who is my opinion, have way better art than he does, and yet, like this journal was about, many of them are struggling financially. And if your a Pollack fan, sorry. That's just my view of his artwork. I know many others have the same opinion, and I'm sure there are many people who think that his artwork is amazing, because as you said, it's all subjective. I didn't think about that factor at all. Very good argument. And thank you. I appreciate that someone agrees about the financial state of the area that one works, is important to know. One of the others thought that it wasn't a good argument because the rates should be the same, internationally, but I don't think that's logical. They way I see it, one could charge $100+/hour, but that artist will still struggle if they don't have enough clients, in a given area, that can afford that rate. For example (not explaining to you, since you understand. I'm just explaining to those who happen to read this, and don't understand), let's say someone is working for individual clients, not a corporation, and they charge $100/hour. Let's say that this person is making a piece of artwork that takes 20 hours, each, to make. So, they charge $2,000 per artwork. So, let's say, that they currently live in a wealthier area, so many people can afford this, so they get 50 clients, so they end up making $100,000, which is a lot of money. Now let's say that this person moves (for some random reason) to an area with an average income. Let's say that they're charging the same ($2,000) for this same piece of artwork. Since they're in an area where most people can't really spend $2,000 on artwork, this person only sells to 20 clients, so they end up only making $40,000, which is really low. So let's say that this person realizes that the area isn't wealthy and realizes that most of the inhabitants can't afford to spend $2,000 on artwork, so they drop they're rate to $50/hour, so the artwork costs $1000. Since they dropped the price, more people an afford it, so then they get 60 clients, so they make $60,000. Now, that's no $100,000, but it's more than $40,000, and $60,000 is over the median income in the US. Now obviously, I just made up numbers that might not be the most realistic, but they still accurately demonstrate that sometimes, having a higher rate, is not always the best choice. 
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:iconkelathi:
Kelathi Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Very well said. And no am not a Pollack fan myself :P hehe
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:iconsportfrog:
SportFrog Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you. And haha. Yeah, his artwork just seems like the artwork of a little kid. Anyone can splatter paint. Plus, I just don't think it looks that great. But his artwork must appeal to A LOT of other people, otherwise he wouldn't be famous, but it's just not my thing.
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:iconkelathi:
Kelathi Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah... agreed XD
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:iconsportfrog:
SportFrog Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Ha. Yeah. xD
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